COMMUNITY AND HEALTHCARE PROVIDER PERSPECTIVES OF MATERNAL AND NEWBORN HEALTH SERVICES IN TWO URBAN SLUM COMMUNITIES OF KAMPALA, UGANDA

Learning-brief-Stakeholder-Perspectives-and-Experiences-on-MNH-Services-in-Kampala.pdf

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Like many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda has an urban growth rate of 5.2% per annum. One consequence of this rapid growth is the formation of large informal settlements (or slums). In Kampala, Uganda’s capital city, an estimated 51% of residents live in informal urban settlements. They are often overcrowded and lack basic infrastructure such as waste disposal, sewage, electricity, and roads. These conditions, in addition to minimally regulated and poor-quality healthcare, disproportionately place slum residents, especially women, at risk for disease and poor health. Despite efforts over the past decade to reduce maternal and neonatal deaths, Uganda’s maternal and neonatal mortality rates remain high, with an estimated 336 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births and 27 neonatal deaths per 1000 live births. Growing evidence from urban poor communities across Asia and Africa show that rates of maternal and neonatal mortality among women and infants living in informal urban settlements is on par, if not higher than in rural areas. In Kampala slums, the estimated stillbirth rate is 43/1000 live births which is more than double the rate of stillbirths in rural areas of the country. This suggests that despite greater access to maternal and neonatal healthcare facilities, urban poor women are not utilizing services or receiving quality care.

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