2016 Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Behavioral Study Vietnam

Final-Sanitation-Behavioral-Study-2016-Report-PSI-VN-September-2017.pdf

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Final-Sanitation-Behavioral-Study-2016-Report-PSI-VN-September-2017-with-edits.pdf

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In December 2016, PSI Vietnam conducted a behavioral study among 1,200 rural households in Tien Giang and Dong Thap provinces to assess PSI’s sanitation social marketing program progress and to inform future improvements in coverage and sanitation as well as hygiene behaviors. This study highlights the continuing need for improved sanitation and hand-washing with soap practices among rural families in Vietnam, and identified factors that need to be addressed in order to improve sanitation and hand-washing practices. One-third of households surveyed still use unhygienic latrines and 15% practice open defecation when they are away from home. Whereas 74.5% of households surveyed report handwashing with soap, only 67% were found with soap available at the place where household hand-washing occurs. Perceived advantages of unhygienic latrines, social acceptance of unhygienic sanitation practices and financial barriers are factors contributing to open defecation and ‘hanging’ or ‘fish pond’ unhygienic sanitation practices among rural households in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. However, the findings of this study also indicate that market-based approaches and social marketing campaigns are contributing to improved sanitation behaviors. After slightly more than one year of implementation of PSI’s sanitation social marketing activities, 23% of rural households surveyed in Tien Giang province reported exposure to PSI’s “TOT” (‘Good”) toilet campaign or ROTO plastic tank brand promotion. Those individuals who reported exposure to PSI programming were more than twice as likely to have built a hygienic latrine in the year prior to the survey compared to individuals who were not exposed to PSI’s program. Message recall was greatest among individuals exposed to outdoor (billboard and boat) signage, mason advice and commune loudspeaker announcements, whereas posters placed in commune health stations yielded the lowest recall of key messages.